Archive for January, 2011

Feline Arthritis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Options

Monday, January 31st, 2011

Cats are stoic creatures, which means they’re often very good at hiding pain.  But as this article points out, the things our cats do that we think are just normal signs of aging–becoming less active, finding new sleeping spots that don’t require jumping up, even pooping alongside, and not in, the litter box–may be signs of arthritis instead.  Although this was written for veterinarians, it’s a good overview of feline arthritis, including symptoms, how it’s diagnosed, and what treatment options are available.  From Veterinary Focus, courtesy of IVIS:

https://www.scoutshouse.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/Feline-Arthritis.pdf

For more information about Scout’s House, go to scoutshouse.com

Watch This Video Before Your Dog has a TPLO

Wednesday, January 26th, 2011

If your dog has torn his cranial cruciate ligament (CCL), chances are he’ll be getting a TPLO to repair it (especially if he’s a big dog).  But did you know dogs may heal more quickly and more effectively from that surgery if they have physical rehabilitation therapy during their recovery?
Check out Scout’s House’s latest Before & After video to see just what a difference rehab can make in your dog’s TPLO recovery.  And for more information, read this abstract of a study done on TPLO recoveries with rehab and without.

Explaining A Veterinary Neuro Exam

Tuesday, January 25th, 2011

We’ve had more than one client ask us to explain the neurological exam that their pets have undergone, both at the veterinary neurologist’s office and at the initial exam at Scout’s House.  Although this article was written for veterinarians, it’s a pretty clear explanation of what your vet is looking for during your pet’s neuro exam:

Making Sense of the Neuro Exam from Veterinary Practice News.

How Veterinarians Choose the Right Joint Supplement for Your Pet

Friday, January 21st, 2011

Ever wonder how your veterinarian decides which joint supplement to recommend for your pet’s arthritis?  Here’s an excellent article from Clinician’s Brief that helps veterinarians choose the right neutraceutical for a pet’s joint health.  (Don’t be put off by the medical-speak; there are some really interesting facts in here.)

https://www.scoutshouse.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/Neutraceuticals-for-Joint-Health-from-Clinicians-Brief.pdf

Onions and Garlic, the Secret Killers of Dogs?

Thursday, January 20th, 2011

Over the years, I’ve seen dozens of homemade dog food and dog treat recipes that include onions and garlic, but I’d also heard that onions and garlic were dangerous for dogs. Naturally, I was confused.  But after reading this blog post by veterinarian Dr. Sophia Yin, I have my answer.  No more onions or garlic for my dogs–not even in small quantities.

Onions, the Secret Killer? | Blog | Dr. Sophia Yin, DVM, MS.

Before & After at Scout’s House: Spinal Cord Trauma [HQ]

Thursday, January 20th, 2011

If you’re not sure about the effectiveness of rehab therapy for animals, just check this video out!

Videos Posted by Scout’s House: Before & After at Scout’s House: Spinal Cord Trauma [HQ].

Before & After at Scout's House: Spinal Cord Trauma [HQ]

Thursday, January 20th, 2011

If you’re not sure about the effectiveness of rehab therapy for animals, just check this video out!

Videos Posted by Scout’s House: Before & After at Scout’s House: Spinal Cord Trauma [HQ].

Rush to Stem Cells Carries Some Risk

Wednesday, January 19th, 2011

There’s a thought-provoking article in this month’s Veterinary Practice News by Dr. Narda Robinson that raises some good questions about the safety of stem cell therapy, which is being used more frequently in veterinary medicine to address a number of health issues, including arthritis and spinal cord damage.
If you’re considering stem cell therapy for your dog or cat, you might want to take a look:

Rush to Stem Cells Carries Some Risk.

Also, be sure to read this post from the International Society for Stem Cell Research.  Although meant for human patients, it’s applicable to animal patients, too:

http://www.closerlookatstemcells.org/Top_10_Stem_Cell_Treatment_Facts.htm

This Newsletter: All About Weak Hind Legs in Dogs and Cats

Monday, January 17th, 2011

Ever wonder what causes a pet to get weak rear legs?  Learn more about Rear Limb Weakness in our latest newsletter:

News from Scout’s House.

Dog Auctions

Thursday, January 13th, 2011

by Lisa Stahr

I have a black Lab, Belle, whom we adopted from Golden Gate Lab Rescue two years ago.  Belle is so sweet, so hungry for love, and so afraid of everything–falling leaves, parked cars, garbage cans, telephone poles, you name it–that my husband and I thought for sure she had vision problems.  She doesn’t, but the veterinarian/animal behaviorist we worked with to help Belle be more comfortable in this world thinks it highly likely that Belle was a breeder dog in a puppy mill.  And that makes total sense.  As a breeder, she probably spent most of her time in a crate or a box, not outside, seeing leaves fall off a tree or a car parked on the street.
So it’s for Belle’s sake that I’m passing this on.  If you love dogs, please read Dr. Nancy Kay’s blog post about dog auctions.  We should all be aware of that these things exist (I didn’t know)–and do something about it.

speakingforspot.com.