Archive for the ‘Pets’ Category

Even Disabled Pets Like to Have Fun

Sunday, January 15th, 2012

Even a cat who’s partially paralyzed still likes to play:

http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=2538039493552

 

The 2011 Scout’s House Holiday Video

Wednesday, December 28th, 2011

For those of you who missed the 2011 Scout’s House Holiday Video, here it is–enjoy!     http://tinyurl.com/cmfftud

 

The 2011 Scout's House Holiday Video

 

Don’t Take No For An Answer

Sunday, November 27th, 2011

Today’s must read: Breast cancer survivor Sue Glader’s inspiring blog post on staring down the N-word. Wise words for people facing cancer, but also for those of us whose pets face critical diseases or disabling injuries. Too often we, as well, are told no. No, your dog can’t have a good life with degenerative myelopathy. No, your cat will never walk again. No, you should put your pet to sleep. Thank you, Sue, for encouraging us to “juke, jive, bob and weave around the negatives in life.”  Some people do it to live, we do it to love.

http://sueglader.wordpress.com/2011/11/27/no-no/

Don't Take No For An Answer

Sunday, November 27th, 2011

Today’s must read: Breast cancer survivor Sue Glader’s inspiring blog post on staring down the N-word. Wise words for people facing cancer, but also for those of us whose pets face critical diseases or disabling injuries. Too often we, as well, are told no. No, your dog can’t have a good life with degenerative myelopathy. No, your cat will never walk again. No, you should put your pet to sleep. Thank you, Sue, for encouraging us to “juke, jive, bob and weave around the negatives in life.”  Some people do it to live, we do it to love.

http://sueglader.wordpress.com/2011/11/27/no-no/

(More Than) Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about Canine Hip Dysplasia

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

For a comprehensive (and perhaps exhaustive) look at canine hip dysplasia, don’t miss this article from Clinician’s Brief.  It’s written for veterinarians but there’s a lot of great information in there for those of us on the other end of the leash!

https://www.scoutshouse.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/Canine-Hip-Dysplasia-Part-I.pdf

Read This If You Give Your Dog Pig Ears

Wednesday, June 8th, 2011

From dvm360 (dvm360.com), recall on pig ears:

Bravo! recalls pig ear treats for possible Salmonella contamination – DVM.

5 Best Ways to Keep Your Dog Out of Rehab Therapy

Friday, May 20th, 2011

1)  Keep Your Dog on A Leash—You wouldn’t believe how many dogs we’ve seen at Scout’s House who suddenly bolted away from their owners and got hit by cars (HBCs, in vet med lingo).  Use a leash and you’ll spare yourself the expense of rehab—and surgery.

Daily controlled exercise will help keep your dog on the outside looking in at your local animal rehab therapy center

2)  Don’t Let Your Dog Jump Off Furniture—Little dogs especially but big dogs too can do a lot of front limb damage jumping off of beds, sofas, out of the car or SUV.  Train your dog to use stairs or a ramp or even to wait for you to put them on the ground.  (Or don’t let them on the furniture in the first place.  Yeah, right!)

3)  Put The Kibosh on Squirrel-Chasing—A veterinary orthopedic surgeon we know gives a slide show on knee surgery for dogs (CCL repair, as it’s known) and always asks the audience what’s the number one cause of CCL tears.  The answer:  squirrels.  Not hard to believe if you’ve ever seen a squirrel-crazed dog take off after her favorite fluffy prey!  Unfortunately, ball-chasing isn’t much better for dog knees.

4)  Keep Her Lean—Fat dogs are more prone to a whole host of medical problems, including arthritis, disk ruptures, and those nasty CCL tears we just talked about.  Keep your girl (or boy) lean and you’ll improve the odds for a healthy dog life.

5)  Keep Him Fit—Making sure your dog gets daily, controlled exercise is the best thing you can do for his musculoskeletal health.  Brisk walks, boisterous play sessions, any controlled exercise can help keep your dog on the outside looking in at your local rehab center.  (The key here is “controlled”—chasing squirrels or balls does not qualify!)

Want to know how physical rehabilitation therapy can help your dog? Click here.

Rehab Therapy: An Opportunity to Practice Patience

Wednesday, May 18th, 2011

I am not known for my patience.  In fact, when I was a kid, my father used to joke that when the good Lord passed out patience, I didn’t bother to wait in line.

But I’ve learned a few things since opening Scout’s House and one of them is that you have to have patience with rehab therapy.  It doesn’t happen overnight.

As many readers of this blog know, I started Scout’s House because I saw what an incredible difference it made in the life of my own dog.  But when I started rehab with Scout, I had no expectations that it would help her.  To be honest, she was such a neurological mess, I didn’t think anything could fix her.  But rehab did.  Not overnight but over months, slowly and steadily.  And I’m so glad I was patient enough to give it time to work.

So if there’s one bit of advice I’d give to anyone considering rehab therapy for her or his pet, it’s this:  have patience. Too many people come to Scout’s House expecting overnight miracles, but that’s not how rehab therapy—or physical therapy for humans—works.  It takes time to regain lost muscle strength, particularly when a leg hasn’t been used for a month or two.  And it takes even more time to retrain a brain to move limbs properly again after, say, a disk rupture or an FCE.

We often tell our new clients to start by bringing their pets in twice a week for two to three weeks and by then they should see at least a little improvement.  And we say twice a week because often the more therapy a pet gets each week, the more quickly you’ll see gains.  It’s just like going to the gym:  go once a week and you won’t see much change over the course of several weeks.  But go twice a week—or even three times a week—and you’ll improve far more rapidly.

So, if you’re headed to rehab with your pet, have patience and give it time to work.  I can’t promise it will–rehab doesn’t help every animal just as physical therapy doesn’t help every human–but if you commit to at least twice a week for two or three weeks, you’ll know if rehab is right for your pet.  And you’ll have the peace of mind, knowing you tried.

What to Do When Your Pet Suddenly Can’t Walk

Wednesday, May 11th, 2011

Having started a rehab therapy center for animals, I often get calls from friends–and friends of friends–about sudden-onset health problems their pets are having.  In the last month, though, I’ve had a run on those calls, all from people whose dogs suddenly couldn’t stand or walk.  They all wanted to know what to do.  And to be honest, I want to scream into the receiver:  TAKE YOUR DOG TO THE VETERINARIAN!

If your spouse or parent or child suddenly couldn’t walk, what would you do?  Would you call a friend to ask what she or he thinks you should do?  Would you just “wait and see” because maybe it’ll get better on its own?  No, I don’t think you would.  I think, at the very least, you’d call a doctor, who would probably tell you to call 911 as it would clearly be a medical emergency.

Likewise, it is a medical emergency when your dog or cat suddenly can’t stand or walk.

There are any number of reasons for sudden paralysis in pets, but I’m here to tell you, none of them are good.  And for most of those issues, time is critical.  If it’s a disk rupture, for example, you have a 24-hour window to have a surgery performed that may give your pet a chance to walk again.  And if it’s a saddle thrombus, your pet is in excruciating pain and needs to be treated immediately.

So if your dog or cat suddenly can’t walk or use even just one of his or her legs, please call your veterinarian immediately.  I guarantee you, it will save you money, time, and heartache in the long run.

What to Do When Your Pet Suddenly Can't Walk

Wednesday, May 11th, 2011

Having started a rehab therapy center for animals, I often get calls from friends–and friends of friends–about sudden-onset health problems their pets are having.  In the last month, though, I’ve had a run on those calls, all from people whose dogs suddenly couldn’t stand or walk.  They all wanted to know what to do.  And to be honest, I want to scream into the receiver:  TAKE YOUR DOG TO THE VETERINARIAN!

If your spouse or parent or child suddenly couldn’t walk, what would you do?  Would you call a friend to ask what she or he thinks you should do?  Would you just “wait and see” because maybe it’ll get better on its own?  No, I don’t think you would.  I think, at the very least, you’d call a doctor, who would probably tell you to call 911 as it would clearly be a medical emergency.

Likewise, it is a medical emergency when your dog or cat suddenly can’t stand or walk.

There are any number of reasons for sudden paralysis in pets, but I’m here to tell you, none of them are good.  And for most of those issues, time is critical.  If it’s a disk rupture, for example, you have a 24-hour window to have a surgery performed that may give your pet a chance to walk again.  And if it’s a saddle thrombus, your pet is in excruciating pain and needs to be treated immediately.

So if your dog or cat suddenly can’t walk or use even just one of his or her legs, please call your veterinarian immediately.  I guarantee you, it will save you money, time, and heartache in the long run.